Maintenance

Snow plowing a Fernie, B.C. driveway on five acres, located 15 minutes from a major ski hill is not a minor task.
Maintenance Connection, the industry’s leading computerized maintenance management software (CMMS) provider, has released the 2017 State of CMMS Report, an analysis of how maintenance software delivers value and benefits operations across industries that conduct maintenance on a daily basis.
Petroleum refinery flare stacks require regular inspections for regulatory, safety and operational purposes. Traditionally, these types of assets are inspected only after the asset and related systems are shut down, allowed to cool and prepared for inspection — a costly endeavour.
July 24, 2014 – Imperial Oil Limited recently completed a major maintenance turnaround at its Cold Lake Mahihkan facilities. The turnaround was executed in five weeks as scheduled and within budget with 200,000 total hours worked.
Asset Performance Canada, ULC ("AP-Canada") has the results of its consortium-sponsored "Oil Sands Turnaround Cost Performance Benchmarking Study." Study sponsors included Suncor, Shell Albian Sands, Shell Scotford Upgrader, and CNRL. Analyzing turnaround data from sponsor sites, the study examined the unique cost drivers affecting Oil Sands turnarounds and uncovered opportunities for cost savings. As Oil Sands facilities have matured, a new focus on operational excellence has arisen. In pursuit of this goal, turnaround costs represent one of the key factors driving competitive performance.
April 8, 2014 — Suncor Energy has begun planned maintenance at the Edmonton refinery. The maintenance work is part of the refinery’s ongoing maintenance program designed to support safe, reliable operations.
In these days of heightened eco awareness, the search for an “environmentally friendly lubricant” or EFL has become a common quest.
In these days of heightened eco awareness, the search for an “environmentally friendly lubricant” or EFL has become a common quest.
In these days of heightened eco awareness, the search for an “environmentally friendly lubricant” or EFL has become a common quest.
Most people are surprised to see maintenance costs go up (!) as they first implement proper planning and scheduling. Maintenance planning and scheduling help an existing workforce complete more maintenance work so, of course, they will use more spare parts each month than they did in the past. Let’s discuss a few planning and scheduling concepts related to cost. These concepts include consideration of parts, contractors, staff levels, reactive work versus proactive work, the “hidden factory,” and both engineering and purchasing decisions.
Planners are the maintenance department’s craft historians. As craftspersons return completed work orders with feedback to improve plans, the planners must save this information so it is readily retrievable. The best way to do this is to use equipment-specific files whether using paper or electronic work orders.
Even when plants protect planners from other duties, that does not mean planners will be planning. Usually craftspersons interrupt planners so much that planners fail in their mission to provide enough job plans. To succeed at planning, plants must actively help planners focus on future work.
The study of friction, wear, and lubrication – otherwise known as Tribology – is of enormous practical importance to industrial maintenance professionals because it can not only optimize functionality but also help prolong the life of mechanical equipment. However, there are few professionals in this field who invest in furthering their knowledge of recent advances, whether lowering friction or reducing wear of mating components.
Equipment and systems are designed to perform some function at pre-determined levels. The design of the system is such that its components are not overloaded in normal operation, so it should operate long and successfully. However, there are times when something goes wrong. That might happen after a certain amount of use or time has elapsed or it might happen at any time (that is, randomly).
Effective field service is about proactively managing your workforce and inventory in order to meet the constantly sliding scale of customer expectations. As a result, field service organizations are constantly looking to improve on the key metrics to better serve customers: first-time fix rate (FTF), mean time to service (MTTS) and mean time to repair (MTTR).
The petrochemical and refinery industry is undergoing profound changes. As technology and innovation lead to new, more efficient and environmentally friendly ways of developing products, many older facilities have closed down.

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