Planning & Scheduling
Maintenance crews typically do not complete nearly as much work as they could simply because they are not given enough work. Instead, they complete enough work to ensure everyone is kept busy completing the reactive work plus PMs that are due. There is a big difference in work completion because of Parkinson’s Law.
The ultimate criteria for how much detail planners should put into a job plan is simply that they must plan nearly all the work in time. The goal of planning is to have very helpful plans for experienced and new craftspersons doing frequent and infrequent work well and to a high consistent standard.
Most people are surprised to see maintenance costs go up (!) as they first implement proper planning and scheduling. Maintenance planning and scheduling help an existing workforce complete more maintenance work so, of course, they will use more spare parts each month than they did in the past. Let’s discuss a few planning and scheduling concepts related to cost. These concepts include consideration of parts, contractors, staff levels, reactive work versus proactive work, the “hidden factory,” and both engineering and purchasing decisions.
Planners are the maintenance department’s craft historians. As craftspersons return completed work orders with feedback to improve plans, the planners must save this information so it is readily retrievable. The best way to do this is to use equipment-specific files whether using paper or electronic work orders.
Even when plants protect planners from other duties, that does not mean planners will be planning. Usually craftspersons interrupt planners so much that planners fail in their mission to provide enough job plans. To succeed at planning, plants must actively help planners focus on future work.
Most people are surprised to see maintenance costs go up (!) as they first implement proper planning and scheduling. Maintenance planning and scheduling help an existing workforce complete more maintenance work so, of course, they will use more spare parts each month than they did in the past. Let’s discuss a few planning and scheduling concepts related to cost. These concepts include consideration of parts, contractors, staff levels, reactive work versus proactive work, the “hidden factory,” and both engineering and purchasing decisions.
Wrench time is an important score, but we do not need to measure it. Schedule compliance is not such an important score, but we should measure it.
Provide weekly schedules to crew supervisors, but give them free rein to work with operations on a daily basis to move things around and break the weekly schedule as appropriate.
Call schedule compliance “Schedule Success.” Schedule compliance sounds like a control tool over the maintenance crew supervisors, which it is not.
Load weekly maintenance schedules up to 100 per cent of the available labour hours for the next week, but only require 40 per cent to 90 per cent schedule attainment. Then let managers be aware of what happened to hinder fuller schedule attainment.
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